Solving Children’s Food Insecurity with Innovation

The goal was to help feed the 50,000 children who don’t get meals on a regular basis. Not getting enough to eat is called food insecurity. Police, educators, public policy makers, industry, and nonprofit food pantries would have to partner together. Although I have worked with several federal agencies over the past several years, my first foray into the local public domain was in Indiana. They asked me to play the process expert and facilitator for a project that could have a significant local impact to urban residents. In setting up the team, we included execs from the police, public policy, food pantries, donors, healthcare and local media.

Secondary research indicated 20% or over 50,000 children in the identified area were food insecure. This number was a significant gap, and we needed to understand what, besides food, was necessary to fix the issue. Reporters conducted our primary research by interviewing dozens of food insecure families. The core team visited multiple food pantries. These combined efforts gave our team the necessary information to make informed decisions. After several months of preparation, the team spent a week together thinking about what solutions would be effective. Several great project ideas came out of our session: police delivered food, food pantries at every school, and an app for information. We named project leads for each idea, and the teams began their work.

It took a while to build some momentum. Sometimes, it looked like it was over before it started. There was a great dream but it faced some obstacles. Fortunately, months after the initial session, the effort is making serious progress. They are delivering meals to hungry children across the entire metropolis in new ways not previously imagined. It took a strong realization to get this effort started, continue it through some tough times and start to impact actual lives. The project is positively affecting people’s health and future.